More promotion

Because I self-publish my books on Kindle, and I have no connections or contacts with anyone else who could promote my work, I have to do that myself. One of the ways is to hand out postcards and other material with details of my latest work. It’s fairly straight forward, but even so, despite all my checking, double checking the wretched grammar gremlin and his friends the punctuation piskie, the lay-out leprechaun, the spelling sprite and the error-elf all rush in behind my back and change things!

I am working on a postcard and flyer for my latest novel The Double Act and have written out a different blurb:

Genet and Lance McCauley run a small hotel in Easthope, a quiet, old-fashioned seaside town.  Nothing ever seems to happen and although sometimes Genet feels trapped and bored, she loves Lance and in most ways is content. Their friends call them the great double act; Genet without Lance? Lance without Genet? Impossible!

The McCauleys have new tenants in a property they own, the enigmatic Dr Herrick and his disabled wife Pamela. As the Herricks settle into the McCauleys’ bungalow, there is an unusual spate of vandalism and graffiti in the town. At first the small, petty events seem to centre on Genet and her friends; however, before long they escalate to violence, arson and attempted murder.

Don’t think ‘The Double Act’ is a romance, this may be a love story… but the other side of love is dark love.

I have my fingers crossed that this time my publicity will be free from mistakes! … I’ll just check it again!

Here is a link to my book on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Double-Act-think-romance-story-ebook/dp/B01349UBHA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1439312566&sr=8-1&keywords=lois+elsden

4 Comments

  1. colonialist

    That looks very intriguing!
    Of course, you have presented a challenge to any editor, who would bet on there being at least one thing still overlooked. Hmmm…
    The only thing I can find is that, according to copybook rules, perhaps the last sentence should be split by a full stop or semicolon as having two independent clauses.

    Liked by 1 person

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