The washing machine is on the blink

I’m so glad I live now and don’t have t go down to the stream and wash our things there, or pump water into a bucket then heat it over a fire, then use muscle power to beat our =t the dirt, wring out the water, rinse in more laboriously collected and heated water, fling over bushes and eventually, if it ever dried in this capricious climate, iron it with irons heated by the fire.

We’re so lucky living at the time we do, but now my washing machine has decided to be temperamental I will have to take the laundry to the launderette/washerette/laundromat/washeteria/ what ever it’s called this week. I can’t wash it in the bath, we don’t have a bath only a shower – I guess i could wash some of it, bit by bit in the small sink, wring it out as best i can and put it on the clothes horses to dry by the warmth of the house – or not. This isn’t practical, so launderette it will be.

When I first left home and lived in shared accommodation this was the way we kept our stuff clean; we would take our bags of laundry and walk to the nearest place, put it in the machines, wait until it was washed and then put it in the driers. Later when I was living with friends we took it in turns – one would take it to be washed, one would iron it and one would have the week off – then next week we would rotate.

We will have to have the machine repaired, but that will cost, and it’s not been a very good machine, no separate temperature control or spin speed control – just set programmes. There is no way to wash a half load and I’m not always convinced it washes things properly. Should we pay to have it repaired, or cut our losses and get a different, better one… which would cost us less in the long run? I wouldn’t often use a clothes drier, but having one available when there is a spell of terrible weather would be really helpful…

This needs thinking about… meanwhile, I’m taking several bags of laundry out… I may be some time…

Here is a great blog about washing in the past:

http://www.oldandinteresting.com/history-of-washing-clothes.aspx

PS: Apparently, although blink is an old word, the term on the blink dates from about 1900

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